17-29 Segment 1: Writing Crime Right: How author Don Winslow approaches hot-topic issues

VPR 17-29A FB

 

Everyone loves a good crime story. Author Don Winslow reveals a special affection for crime in his novels. Famous for writing fiction and nonfiction novels on drug cartels and law enforcement, Winslow has just released another book called The Force. The New York Times already added this book to their bestseller list in its first month of release.

Winslow spent a great deal of time with policemen and women to truly understand their thoughts and how their occupation affects their lives. In this novel, Winslow addresses the controversial issue of current police shootings head-on, which he says is a hard conversation to have with most cops. Winslow says that he could not write a police book in 2017 without addressing the issues that are in front of all of us. He admitted that some officers were completely open about the topic, while others brushed the issue aside.

In addition to addressing police shootings, Winslow also dedicates a section of his novel to those police who have fallen while on the job. He thinks that acknowledging both sides of this issue is important to tell the complete story.

Guest:

  • Don Winslow, author of The Force

Links for more information:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Advertisements

17-25 Segment 1: Adventure in the Jungle: The Discovery of the Maya Civilization

VPR 17-25A FB

 

Discovering one of the most well-known ancient civilizations was no easy task. We talk to author William Carlsen about the two men who ventured into the jungle and discovered the Mayans.

In 1839, rumors of extraordinary yet baffling stone ruins buried within the unmapped jungles of Central America reached two of the world’s most intrepid explorers. Seized by the reports, American diplomat John Lloyd Stephens and British artist Frederick Catherwood—both already celebrated for their adventures in Egypt, the Holy Land, Greece, and Rome—sailed together out of New York Harbor on an expedition into the forbidding rainforests of present-day Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico. What they found would upend the West’s understanding of human history.

In the tradition of Lost City of Z and In the Kingdom of Ice, former San Francisco Chronicle journalist and Pulitzer Prize finalist William Carlsen reveals the remarkable story of the discovery of the ancient Maya. Enduring disease, war, and the torments of nature and terrain, Stephens and Catherwood meticulously uncovered and documented the remains of an astonishing civilization that had flourished in the Americas at the same time as classic Greece and Rome—and had been its rival in art, architecture, and power. Their masterful book about the experience, written by Stephens and illustrated by Catherwood, became a sensation, hailed by Edgar Allan Poe as “perhaps the most interesting book of travel ever published” and recognized today as the birth of American archaeology. Most important, Stephens and Catherwood were the first to grasp the significance of the Maya remains, understanding that their antiquity and sophistication overturned the West’s assumptions about the development of civilization.

By the time of the flowering of classical Greece (400 b.c.), the Maya were already constructing pyramids and temples around central plazas. Within a few hundred years the structures took on a monumental scale that required millions of man-hours of labor, and technical and organizational expertise. Over the next millennium, dozens of city-states evolved, each governed by powerful lords, some with populations larger than any city in Europe at the time, and connected by road-like causeways of crushed stone. The Maya developed a cohesive, unified cosmology, an array of common gods, a creation story, and a shared artistic and architectural vision. They created stucco and stone monuments, sculpting figures and hieroglyphs with refined artistic skill. At their peak, an estimated ten million people occupied the Maya’s heartland on the Yucatan Peninsula, a region where only half a million now live. And yet by the time the Spanish reached the “New World,” the Maya had all but disappeared; they would remain a mystery for the next three hundred years.

Today, the tables are turned: the Maya are justly famous, if sometimes misunderstood, while Stephens and Catherwood have been nearly forgotten. Based on Carlsen’s rigorous research and his own 1,500-mile journey throughout the Yucatan and Central America, Jungle of Stone is equally a thrilling adventure narrative and a revelatory work of history that corrects our understanding of Stephens, Catherwood, and the Maya themselves.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Guest:

  • William Carlsen, author of Jungle of Stone: The true story of two men, their extraordinary journey, and the discovery of the lost civilization of the Maya

Links for more information:

17-24 Segment 1: The Virtues of Being an Introvert

17-24A The Virtues of Being an Introvert

 

In modern society, introverts have often been depicted as shy, easily overwhelmed, or as having poor communication skills. The notions, stereotypes, and cultural understandings of introverted individuals are discussed by Todd Kashdan, Professor of Psychology at George Mason University, and Sophia Dembling, author of The Introvert’s Way: Living a quiet life in a noisy world. Recalling the names of some of history’s best introverted leaders, such as Nelson Mandela and Ghandi, Kashdan says that introverts hold different qualities that allow them to be less subjectable to impulses and more self-controlled, prudent, and cautious due to their lack of outward reaction. Negating the claim that introverts are typically anti-social or, “misanthropic”, Kashdan also suggests that introverts have good social skills and are very personable, they simply tire of socializing at a quicker speed than extroverts. Author Sophia Dembling goes on to say that introverts are not necessarily, “shy,” as shyness may generally be fear-motivated. Instead she claims that introverts don’t feel a pressing need to be around others, and are content with holding a conversation with someone rather than being in a crowd. Kashdan agrees with this description of introverts, stating that, “The point at which [introverts] are saturated, at which they’re reached enough satisfaction being around people is quicker than your extroverted, sociable, gregarious, highly-friendly person.” Environment is also significant when understanding social stressors for introverts. Anything from noise, to fragrance, to sound, even to the energy level in a room can cause sensitivity in introverts. However, this heightened sense of feeling proves beneficial, Kashdan assures, as introverts are exemplary observers and can read situations well from the start.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Guests:

Todd Kashdan, Professor of Psychology, George Mason University, author of the book Mindfulness, Acceptance and Positive Psychology

Sophia Dembling, introvert, author of the book, The Introvert’s Way: Living a quiet life in a noisy world

Links for more information:

toddkashdan.com

The Introvert’s Way: Living a quiet life in a noisy world

17-23 Segment 1: Beating a Mental Health Crisis: One couple’s journey through the psych ward

VPR 17-23A FB

One morning without warning, Giulia Lukach experienced a psychotic break. We talk to her husband Mark about Giulia’s mental health journey, his own experience as a caregiver, and how they overcame three stints in the psych ward.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

 

Guest:

  • Mark Lukach, author of My Lovely Wife in the Psych Ward: A Memoir

Links for more information:

17-22 Segment 1: The Lost Art of Writing Letters

VPR 17-22A FB

 

Everyday, we send and receive emails, but when’s the last time you wrote or received a handwritten letter? We talk to a writer and editor about the more romantic, considered communication style of abandoning modern technology and writing physical letters.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Click here for guest information and the transcript

17-21 Segment 1: Video Game Evolution

VPR 17-21A FB

 

Video games have long been seen as child’s play, but now they are the source of massive TV ratings and legitimate artistic expression. We talk to author Andrew Ervin about the transformation.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Click here for guest information and the transcript

17-20 Segment 1: The Most Wanted Man on Wall Street: The Fed’s pursuit of SAC Capital

VPR FB 17-20A

 

The financial world was shocked when the FBI began investigating Wall Street big shot Steve Cohen and his company SAC Capital. We discuss what they were looking for, what they found, and what it all means going forward.

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Click here for guest information and the transcript