17-34 Segment 2: The Overlooked Importance of College Professors

 

When choosing which college to attend, we often consider things like the school’s graduation rate or how successful its graduates are at landing jobs. Georgetown University Professor Jacques Berlinerblau says it’s even more important to examine professors — what their roles are, how they interact with students, and the involvement in their curriculum.

Berlinerblau notes that professors can make or break a student’s college experience. Many professors do not give their undergraduate students enough attention. Berlinerblau describes this situation as a ‘nationwide crisis’ because he feels too many people spend too much money on uninterested professors. He believes that only 10-25% of professors truly value undergraduate teaching.

Berlinerblau suggests finding colleges with smaller class sizes. This allows for more student-professor interaction and can improve students’ grades tremendously. Additionally, he suggests browsing college websites for concrete evidence of professor-undergraduate pairing to make sure your incoming college student can receive proper attention for the next four years.

Guests:

  • Jacques Berlinerblau, Georgetown University professor and author of Campus Confidential: How college works, or doesn’t, for professors, parents, and students

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Culture Crash 17-20: Aziz Ansari Has a Lot to Say in “Master of None”

CC Master of None Audiogram

 

Welcome to Culture Crash, where we examine American culture, what’s new and old in books, film, and entertainment.

This weekend, you may have noticed a Netflix banner for the new season of Master of None. The show was created by, and stars, comedian Aziz Ansari and made a big splash in the fall of 2015 when it first debuted.

Ansari, a veteran of the NBC hit Parks and Recreation, created the show with friend and Parks writer Alan Yang. Master of None follows the life of an Indian-American actor named Dev, played by Ansari, and his life in New York City.

We watch as Dev and his friends date, travel, and visit food trucks around the city. Like Seinfeld or Louie, the show embraces the slice-of-life approach. But unlike Seinfeld, Master of None abandons the idea of being about nothing.

Most episodes of Master are self-contained but they deal with personal and political issues that we have all faced at one time or another. The second episode of the show is called Parents and the audience watches as the relationships between characters and their parents are put under the microscope. We see the sacrifice parents make for their kids, especially immigrant parents, and how easy it is for younger generations to dismiss that sacrifice.

Similar statements are made in later episodes about respecting the elderly, the mistreatment of women online, and a particularly powerfully episode titled, Indians on TV shows just how comfortable American media is with stereotypes and whitewashing minorities, especially when it comes to depicting Indian culture.

Master of None is just one of many shows Netflix is advertising. The banners and promos may well quickly fade when Frank Underwood makes his return in the latest season of House of Cards later this month.

But Master of None is worth seeking out. Each episode will make you laugh and give you food for thought about how we treat each other and what we all take for granted.

Seasons one and two of Master of None are now streaming on Netflix.

I’m Evan Rook.

16-26 Segment 1: Grit: The passion and perseverance to succeed

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Why is it that some people succeed and others don’t? There are many reasons why we follow through on the tasks we begin, but our guest thinks that those who do succeed in the big things in life have something called “grit.” We discuss how passion, hope and perseverance all play into the ability for some individuals to keep on course –even when they face hurdles in their lives and their work — and accomplish great things.

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Click here for guest information and the transcript

15-31 Segment 2: Talking About Abortion and Other Touchy Topics in a New Way

 

Synopsis: Its seems that when the topic of abortion comes up in the media, there are two distinct sides voicing their opinions with no middle ground or real conversation on the topic. The debate over this issue and other touchy topics these days usually disintegrates into an “Us vs. Them” shouting match, leaving many on both sides and in the middle angry and dissatisfied. Our guest offers a new way to discuss abortion – without taking sides, without name-calling or raised voices — that brings the issue to a more personal and compassionate level.

Host: Marty Peterson. Guests: Aspen Baker, co-founder and executive director of Exhale, author of the book, “Pro-Voice: How to keep listening when the world wants a fight.”

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Click here for the transcript