Coming Up On Viewpoints Show 17-29

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Writing Crime Right: How author Don Winslow approaches hot-topic issues

Author Don Winslow’s books have attracted filmmakers like Oliver Stone and James Mangold. We talk to him about his latest novel, “The Force” and how he tries to accurately portray issues like police shootings of unarmed black men, law enforcement corruption, and more.

Losing a Legacy: The collapse of the Stroh Brewing Company

Frances Stroh grew up in the family that owned America’s third biggest brewer, Stroh Brewing Company. As she aged into adulthood, she watched as both the brewery and her family life fell apart. She talks about the struggles the company faced, how her family dealt with it, and when a legacy can become a burden.

17-28 Segment 1: Domestic Violence: How it happens and how we can try to stop it

 

17-28 Segment 2: Asa Jennings: A forgotten American hero

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After World War I, the city of Smyrna was set ablaze and people had to run to the beaches just to escape the flames. We’ll hear how governments and diplomats in the West all but ignored their plight, and how the efforts of one brave relief worker and a Navy commander finally brought the victims to safety.

Read the entire transcript here.

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Guests:

  • Lou Ureneck, Professor of Journalism at Boston University, author of The Great Fire: One American’s mission to rescue victims of the 20th century’s first genocide

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Culture Crash 17-28: Pop Music

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Liking pop music is usually thought of as shallow and immature, but why? Pop music gave us The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and yes, Justin Timberlake.

Coming Up On Viewpoints Show 17-28

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Domestic Violence: How it happens and how we can try to stop it

Domestic abuse is something many women and men will experience in their lives. We talk to two psychologists familiar with the subject about what victims can do to remove themselves from the abuse and how being a witness to or a victim of abuse affects the intimate relationship, children and the family dynamic.

Asa Jennings: A forgotten American hero

After World War I, the city of Smyrna was set ablaze and people had to run to the beaches just to escape the flames. We’ll hear how governments and diplomats in the West all but ignored their plight, and how the efforts of one brave relief worker and a Navy commander finally brought the victims to safety.

17-27 Segment 1: What Big Data Can Teach Us About Ourselves

 

Have you ever lied on a survey or a social media post? Stephens-Davidowitz says that almost all of us do. He researched the data of big websites like Google and Facebook to discover that what people say or post about themselves often seems contradictory to what their internet searches reveal about their interests or beliefs.

Ever since the introduction of Google, Big Data has been a large part of our lives. Every  time you’ve ever searched something on the internet, you’ve added to the Big Data about you. Although you may not realize it, data experts are analyzing your online behavior to learn more about you, your lifestyle and your spending habits – and it’s all based off of what you search. In his new book Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are, Stephens-Davidowitz dives into some deep truths about ourselves and our data we might not want to hear.

From the Foreword to Everybody Lies by Steven Pinker, author of The Better Angels of our Nature:

Blending the informed analysis of The Signal and the Noise with the instructive iconoclasm of Think Like a Freak, a fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveals about ourselves and our world—provided we ask the right questions.

By the end of an average day in the early twenty-first century, human beings searching the internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information—unprecedented in history—can tell us a great deal about who we are—the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us, and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than twenty years ago, seemed unfathomable.

Everybody Lies offers fascinating, surprising, and sometimes laugh-out-loud insights into everything from economics to ethics to sports to race to sex, gender and more, all drawn from the world of big data. What percentage of white voters didn’t vote for Barack Obama because he’s black? Does where you go to school affect how successful you are in life? Do parents secretly favor boy children over girls? Do violent films affect the crime rate? Can you beat the stock market? How regularly do we lie about our sex lives and who’s more self-conscious about sex, men or women?

Investigating these questions and a host of others, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz offers revelations that can help us understand ourselves and our lives better. Drawing on studies and experiments on how we really live and think, he demonstrates in fascinating and often funny ways the extent to which all the world is indeed a lab. With conclusions ranging from strange-but-true to thought-provoking to disturbing, he explores the power of this digital truth serum and its deeper potential—revealing biases deeply embedded within us, information we can use to change our culture, and the questions we’re afraid to ask that might be essential to our health—both emotional and physical. All of us are touched by big data everyday, and its influence is multiplying. Everybody Lies challenges us to think differently about how we see it and the world.

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Guest:

  • Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, author of Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are

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17-27 Segment 2: The Story of Apollo 8

 

Many of us have heard the heroic tales of Apollo 11 and Apollo 13, the missions to send men to the moon, but what about the other missions? When Astronauts Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders fearlessly took off in December of 1968 and safely orbited the moon, they paved the way for the future space exploration to come. Author Jeffrey Kluger recently wrote Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon about this mission and its impact on history and science.

In August 1968 NASA made a bold decision: In just 16 weeks, the United States would launch humankind’s first flight to the moon. Only the year before, three astronauts had burned to death in their spacecraft, and since then the Apollo program had suffered one setback after another. Meanwhile, the Russians were winning the space race, the Cold War was getting hotter by the month, and President Kennedy’s promise to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade seemed sure to be broken. But when Borman, Lovell, and Anders were summoned to a secret meeting and told of the dangerous mission, they instantly signed on.

The race to prepare an untested rocket for an unprecedented journey paves the way for the hair-raising trip to the moon. Then, on Christmas Day, a nation that has suffered a horrendous year of assassinations and war is heartened by an inspiring message from the trio of astronauts in lunar orbit. And when the mission is over – after the first view of the far side of the moon, the first Earth-rise, and the first reentry through the Earth’s atmosphere following a flight to deep space – the impossible dream of walking on the moon suddenly seems within reach.

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Guest:

  • Jeffrey Kluger, author of Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon

Links for more information:

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