Coming Up On Viewpoints

 

Post-Election Protests: Can They Make Real Change? Since the election, protests for issues on both sides of the political spectrum have grabbed headlines. A women’s march, a march for life, a march for science, the list goes on. But can these protests make a difference, and if so, where? We talk to political science experts about movements that have succeeded in the past and how change may come about, specifically when it comes to the electoral college system that some feel over-values certain states over others.

Sweatshops and Unfair Labor Practices: Corban Addison is a law-trained author who uses his books to shine a light on human rights violations. He joins the show to talk about researching his latest novel, A Harvest of Thorns, about sweatshops and unfair labor. Addison talks about the violations he found around the world including here in America and the brands he recommends for shoppers trying to make a positive impact with where they spend their dollars.

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17-08 Segment 1: The Funny Side of Philosophy

Plato the philosopher with a funny hat and Athena, godess of wisdom and philosophy

 

Often, philosophy is so dense and hard to fully process that it feels impossible to understand and enjoy. Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein are trying to fix that problem. Their book, Plato and a Platypus Walk Into a Bar explains some of the deepest thinkers of all time, like Immanuel Kant or John Locke, with humor. Both authors join the show to tell stories, crack jokes, and clarify some of the big ideas of philosophy.

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17-08 Segment 2: Civil Rights History: The March Against Fear

By Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News & World Report [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AJames_Meredith.jpg

 

In 1966, Civil Rights pioneer James Meredith set out on The March Against Fear, a walk to prove black citizens no longer needed to fear white people. Soon after beginning, he was ambushed and shot. The march was continued by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Stokely Carmichael, and countless others. Weeks later, Meredith had recovered and rejoined the walk, giving history an enduring image of persistence and determination. We talk to historian Ann Bausum about the history and impact of the march.

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17-07 Segment 1: Lessons on the Pursuit of Happiness

Happy Umbrella woman jumping and sunset silhouette

 

In a country that seems to be pulling away more and more every day, it can seem nearly impossible to find time for yourself to clear your mind and feel joy. We talk to Douglas Abrams about the week he spent learning from two of the world’s spiritual leaders, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Abrams shares the joy practices and little things that the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Tutu do daily to experience joy regularly.

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17-07 Segment 2: Empowering Your Community to Create Change

diversity friends friendship team community concept

 

The news typically shows us stories about the national government being stuck in a gridlock on most of the big, important issues. Sarah Van Gelder, co-founder of Yes! Magazine, went on a trip across America to see how change is being made at the local level and found inspirational stories and examples of community involvement solving big problems while paving the way for a better future. She shares these anecdotes and helpful hints for others out there hoping to make a difference in their area.

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17-06 Segment 1: History, Not Precedent: America’s Internment Camps

Barracks building at internment camp

 

Japanese internment camps are something we’re aware of, but may not fully understand. Photo historian and author Richard Cahan talks about the history of the camps, what makes them so “un-American,” and why he says we shouldn’t look back at the camps as precedent or a blueprint, but as a black eye we should avoid repeating at all costs.

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17-06 Segment 2: The Craft and Responsibility of Writing Books for Young People

Girls reading books in library

 

We encourage our children to read but what are they reading? We talk to two authors, one for children and one for young adults, who discuss juggling their desire to entertain with the necessity of teaching young people about ethics, history, and tougher topics like drugs and addiction.

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Click here for guest information and the transcript