UP NEXT WEEK ON VIEWPOINTS

 

The Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest: Everyone knows the line “It was a dark and stormy night” from Snoopy’s exploits as a budding novelist. But do you know the real author of that famous line, and why he has a literary competition named after him? We’ll talk to the retired professor of English and contest creator about the famous aristocrat and author who lent his name to a quirky contest, and why he was a better writer than he’s been given credit for. We’ll also hear some of the winning entries from past Bulwer-Lytton Contests.

Meditation in the workplace: We’re always hearing about how everyone is stressed these days, that we have too much to do and too many people asking for a moment – or more! – of our time. What can we do to keep our bosses happy, our clients needs fulfilled and ourselves from pulling out our hair? We talk to two men who have found that meditating can help workers become more productive, less stressed and happier overall.

 

15-12 Story 1: Stolen Art – Getting away with millions!

 

Synopsis: This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Gardner Museum heist of millions of dollars in paintings by Rembrandt, Vermeer and others. Nobody knows who took the paintings, but our guest has a theory. We also talk to an art expert and an art show coordinator about what happens to stolen art, how art is determined to be genuine, and how to avoid scams if you’re buying or selling art and antiques.

Host: Gary Price. Guests: Stephen Kurkjian, journalist and author of the book, “Master Thieves: The Boston gangsters who pulled off the world’s greatest art heist”; Jane C.H. Jacob, art consultant, president of Jacob Fine Art, Oak Park, IL; Scott Diament, president & CEO of the Palm Beach Show Group.

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Click here for transcript.

15-12 Story 2: What the Dog Knows – Navigating the world through scent

 

Synopsis: Search dogs will follow a scent for miles and even put their lives in danger looking for survivors of mudslides and building collapses. How do they do it, and why? We talk to a search dog owner and trainer about these amazing animals, the physiology that helps them hone in on a single scent, and why they will work for hours in horrid conditions for their handlers.

Host: Marty Peterson. Guest: Cat Warren, cadaver dog owner and trainer, author of the book, “What the Dog Knows: Scent, science and the amazing ways dogs perceive the world.

Links for more info:

Click here for the transcript.

15-11 Story 1: The Art of Quitting

 

Synopsis: Many people remain in bad situations because they are afraid to quit, but they shouldn’t. Our guest says that if you take the time to carefully plan just how and when you’ll walk out the door, it’s easier to deal with the anxiety, fear and depression that can follow such a big decision. We’ll hear about steps anyone can take – and those they shouldn’t – when it’s time to quit and move on.

Host: Gary Price. Guest: Peg Streep writes non-fiction, is a blogger at Psychology Today.com and the author of the book, “Quitting: Why we fear it, and why we shouldn’t, in life, love and work,” now out in paperback.

Links for more info:

 

Click here for transcript.

15-10 Story 1: Choosing the Boss: What makes a good CEO?

 

SYNOPSIS: A number of high-profile companies have appointed new CEOs lately. What is it that makes one candidate better than another to lead a corporation and make it innovative and profitable? We talk to two management specialists about the characteristics of a good leader, what the CEO is responsible for, and what sets great CEOs apart from other business leaders.

Host: Gary Price. Guests: Bill Pasmore, Organizational Practice Leader at the Center for Creative Leadership, and Professor of Social Organizational Psychology at Columbia University, NYC; Adam Bryant, “The Corner Office” columnist for the New York Times, and author of the book, “Quick and Nimble: Lessons from leading CEOs on how to create a culture of innovation.”

Links for more info:

Click here for the transcript.

15-10 Story 2: The Most Human Human

 

Synopsis: The Academy Award-nominated film, “The Imitation Game” brought to light the contributions of Alan Turing in breaking the Enigma code during WWII. Throughout his career, he thought that maybe we could build a computer that could think like a human. But could even the best tech whizzes of today build a machine that could not only think but also converse like a human? We talk to a man who researched that issue and even competed in a contest to prove he was human, and find out what it takes for chatbots to beat humans at their own games.

Host: Marty Peterson. Guests: Brian Christian, author of “The Most Human Human: What talking with computers teaches us about what it means to be alive.”

Links for more info:

Click here for the transcript.