Up Next Week on Viewpoints

Does it ever seem like the more you try to get stuff done, the less you accomplish? It may be that you’re expending too much energy on doing and not enough on planning ahead of time. We talk to two experts in the field about some simple strategies you can use to make more of the time you have to get things done.

With the baby boomers transitioning into retirement in record numbers, and their parents living longer, we’re facing an eldercare challenge that’s bigger than we’ve ever seen before in this country. Who will take care of all of the older Americans who will need medical and end-of-life assistance in the coming decades? And how will we ensure that elder citizens will be able to live in comfort and dignity during their senior years? We talk to an activist about her own experiences with the system, and learn about strategies for dealing with the eldercare challenges that face us.

15-20 Story 1: The Importance of Letter Writing

Synopsis: When was the last time you wrote or received a real, handwritten letter in the mail? It’s sad that there are young people today who will never experience the joy of getting or writing a personal letter during their lives. We talk to a writer and editor about the importance of letter writing, and what we can learn from reading letters from notables and unknowns of the past.

Host: Gary Price. Guest: Shaun Usher, writer, editor of the book, Letters of Note: An eclectic collection of correspondence deserving of a wider audience.

Links for more info:

Click here for the transcript.

15-20 Story 2: Ethnic Cooking and Baking Without All the Guilt

Synopsis: America is a melting pot of many nationalities, races and religions, each with its own traditions and cuisines. Some of the food that is so loved by families across the country isn’t the healthiest, however, and can cause obesity, blood sugar problems and heart issues. We talk to two experienced cooks and an award-winning baker about how they are trying to make ethnic dishes and baked goods a bit healthier while maintaining the flavors and textures of the traditional dishes.

Host: Marty Peterson. Guests: Caroline Randall Williams, co-author of Soul Food Love: Healthy recipes inspired by one hundred years of cooking in a Black family; Leah Koenig, author of Modern Jewish Cooking: Recipes & customs for today’s kitchen; Joanne Chang, owner of Flour Bakery + Café, Boston and Cambridge, MA, author of Baking with Less Sugar: Recipes for desserts using natural sweeteners and little-to-no white sugar.

Links for more info:

Click here for the transcript.

15-19 Story 1: Becoming Steve Jobs

Synopsis: Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs, was hailed as a genius during his lifetime for the success he and his partner made of the fledgling computer company. However, Jobs was also accused of being a divisive manager who burnt out his employees, and was eventually sidelined at his own company. We talk to one of his biographers about how Jobs changed his ways after he left Apple, and how his experiences with NeXt Computer, Pixar, and becoming a husband and father helped him develop into a savvier, more understanding innovator and leader.

Host: Gary Price. Guest: Rick Tetzeli, co-author with Brent Schlender, of the book, “Becoming Steve Jobs: The evolution of a reckless upstart into a visionary leader.”

Links for more info:

Click here for the transcript.

15-19 Story 2: Women of the Atomic Age

Synopsis: The Atomic Age is credited mostly to men like Einstein, Oppenheimer and Fermi. Although there’s no question that these eminent scientists were leaders in the development and understanding of nuclear power, there were also many women who contributed knowledge and sometimes their health and lives, but who are overshadowed by the men. We talk to two authors whose books give these women the recognition they deserve.

Host: Marty Peterson. Guests: Craig Nelson, author of “The Age of Radiance: The epic rise and dramatic fall of the Atomic Era.” Denise Kiernan, author of the best-selling book, “The Girls of Atomic City,” now in paperback.

Links for more info:

Click here for the transcript.

15-18 Story 1: Baseball Movies: Why are they so popular?

 

Synopsis: There are movies about a lot of sports and athletic competitions, but for some reason baseball outnumbers them all. Why is that? And what are the hallmarks of a good baseball movie? We talk to an author and professor of communications, and to a baseball novelist, player and screenwriter about these issues. We’ll also hear about a novel way one guest is seeking to “crowdfund” and cast his upcoming baseball film.

Host: Gary Price. Guests: Brother Gerry Molyneaux, Prof. of Communications, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA, author of several film biographies including John Sayles: An unauthorized biography of the pioneer filmmaker. Mark Donahue, author of the novel, Last At Bat, screenwriter and life-long baseball player.

Links for more info:

 

Click here for transcript.

15-18 Story 2: A New Look at the Bill of Rights

 

Synopsis: When we learn about the Bill of Rights in school, we often look at it as ten separate amendments to our Constitution instead of as a single, well-structured work, like a poem or symphony. Our guest didn’t see this either, until he needed a document to type while practicing his word processing program. We’ll hear about his realization that the Bill of Rights is, indeed, a cohesive and carefully plotted document, how it captures the essence of democracy that our forefathers fought for, and how, in modern cases, he thinks some Supreme Court decisions undermine the founders’ intentions.

Host: Marty Peterson. Guest: Burt Neuborne, Norman Dorsen Professor of Civil Liberties at NYU Law School, former National Legal Director of the ACLU, author of the book, Madison’s Music: On reading the First Amendment.

Links for more info:

Click here for transcript.