Coming up on Viewpoints Show 17-51

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America’s Diner Waitresses

Diners are an American staple. It’s where you stop for a piece of pie and a cup of coffee from coast to coast. But diners are slowly disappearing to larger chains. We talk about the waitresses who make the diners function and the culture behind the career.

Creating Great Teams with Diverse Thought

It may seem like the best way to create a business is to only include the best and the brightest. But limiting your group to any standard, even Ivy League-education, can lead to groupthink. We talk to one expert about how cognitive diversity can improve the results for a school, business, or even an entire society.

Culture Crash: 2017’s “Little” Horror Movies

This year, low-cost horror movies like “Get Out” made big noise at the box office and now, the awards conversation. We discuss one man responsible for the trend: producer Jason Blum.

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Coming Up On Viewpoints Show 17-48

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Giving Back This Holiday Season

During the holidays, many parents fret over the materialistic messages their children are exposed to. We talk to a mom and an author who together have created a children’s book and game designed to make giving back to others a fun pursuit.

W.E.B. Du Bois’s Lasting Impact in Sociology

At the beginning of the 20th century, W.E.B. Du Bois revolutionized scientific sociology, but was denied accolades because of his race. Now, we talk to scholars about what exactly Du Bois did to improve the study of sociology and what his impact truly was.

17-50 Segment 1: The Role of a Literary Editor

 

You see authors thank their editors all the time in the acknowledgements section of a book. But exactly what does an editor do? We talk to an editor himself who explains to us what an editor does to get the book from a manuscript to the finished copy on store shelves

Guest:

  • Peter Ginna, literary editor and author, What Editors Do

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17-50 Segment 2: How to Navigate New Situations

 

When you’re the new person at the office, in the neighborhood or at a party it can be an awkward situation, especially if you’re not the most gregarious person. Our guest discusses the issue and offers advice on how to navigate various situations when you’re the newbie in the room.

Guest:

  • Keith Rollag, Associate Professor of Management, and Chairman of the Management Division at Babson College, Wellesley, MA, and of author of What to Do When You’re New: How to be comfortable, confident and successful in new situations

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Culture Crash 17-50: Christmas Music

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Welcome to Culture Crash, where we examine american culture. What’s new and old in books, film, and entertainment.

No time of year has more classics and standards than the holiday season. Beginning in early November, you can’t help but to start hearing the familiar Christmas tunes of years past in department stores and on the radio.

Personally, I’m a strong believer that Christmas music is appropriate starting on Black Friday and extending until New Years Day. Once Thanksgiving dinner is done, I pull the records out of the drawer and once New Years has past, I put them back away… metaphorically, of course. What I literally mean is I take my Christmas playlist out of a hidden folder in Spotify for a month or so and then hide it again.

Naturally, I enjoy the Christmas classics- Chuck Berry singing “Run Run Rudolph”, Frank Sinatra’s “Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow”, and Nat King Cole’s “Joy To The World.”

And then I enjoy the more modern Christmas wrinkles like NSYNC’s infectious “Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays” and Kelly Clarkson’s “Wrapped in Red.”

But like all families, my family has some holiday traditions of our own. My dad’s favorite Christmas tunes come from the Beach Boys, so this is the time of year I like to enjoy “Little Saint Nick”, “Santa’s Beard”, and the “Man with All the Toys.

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But one of my most cherished Christmas traditions is listening to my mom’s favorite Christmas album. Every year growing up, or at least some years, my sister, my brother, and me would open our presents to Amy Grant’s Christmas album. Nothing says Christmas day to me more than hearing Amy Grant’s “Emmanuel.”

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Admittedly, “Emmanuel” is probably a classic to no one outside of my family-and maybe Amy Grant’s- but for us, it’s essential Christmas listening.

Whatever your favorite Christmas songs are, whatever you consider the appropriate time to blast them in your car, and especially you only want a hippopotamus for Christmas, there’s no debating that now is the time to revel in that warm holiday feeling that comes with hearing the Christmas songs you cherish the most.

I’m Evan Rook.

Coming Up On Viewpoints Show 17-50

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The Role of a Literary Editor

You see authors thank their editors all the time in the acknowledgements section of a book. But exactly what does an editor do? We talk to an editor himself who explains to us what an editor does to get the book from a manuscript to the finished copy on store shelves.

Being the Newcomer: How to navigate new situations

When you’re the new person at the office, in the neighborhood or at a party it can be an awkward situation, especially if you’re not the most gregarious person. Our guest discusses the issue and offers advice on how to navigate various situations when you’re the newbie in the room.

17-49 Segment 1: Making an Impact as a Citizen Scientist

Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, authored by Mary Ellen Hannibal, attempts to rekindle the notion that science is available to all citizens, not just the experts. Charles Darwin, was a so-called citizen scientist, with no degree or training, he is now considered the ‘father’ of Evolution.

With modern technology, it’s easier than ever to collect data and share it with anyone on the planet to create mass collections of data. Hannibal says we are currently in a mass extinction of plants and animals, and argues it’s crucial that citizens come together to share their observations. She explains observing and recording different species of plants and animals, like Darwin did, can lead to the same kind of groundbreaking analysis that led to the theory of Evolution.

The director of Audubon Society’s annual Christmas Bird Count, Geoff LeBaron, says average citizens can be the eyes and ears of big data collection. LeBaron shares many scientist were apprehensive to use data collected by citizens, but because of the techniques created scientists now accept the findings of studies like the Christmas Bird Count. If you’re interested in getting involved in citizen science, go to the Nature’s Notebook webiste: https://www.usanpn.org/nn/become-observer to become part of an observational science team.

Guests:

  • Mary Ellen Hannibal, author, Citizen Scientist: Searching for heroes and hope in an age of extinction
  • Geoff LeBaron, director of Audubon Society’s annual Christmas Bird Count

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17-49 Segment 2: Author Jack London’s Writings and Social Activism

 

Jack London is known for the adventure and intrigue of his writings. Lesser known are the struggles London faced before he became a published author. He was well acquainted with manual labor under terrible working condition for minimal wages. The plight of laborers and the injustice they felt is woven into his fast paced plots.

Cecelia Tichi, Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University, as well as author of Jack London: A Writer’s Fight for a Better America, went back and reread all of London’s writings with social activism in mind. She found that London made a habit of commenting on social topics, specifically poverty and exploited workers.

Tichi explains Call of the Wild, London’s breakout work, contrasts American ideals with poverty and exploitation. She argues London deserve to be recognized as a forward political thinker, not just an author of exciting plot twists. Learn more at Tichi’s website: jacklondonbook.com  

Guest:

  • Cecelia Tichi, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of English and professor of American Studies at Vanderbilt University, author, Jack London: A writer’s fight for a better America.

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